An inconvenient truth? Interpersonal and career consequences of “maybe baby” expectations

An inconvenient truth? Interpersonal and career consequences of “maybe baby” expectations

26. Oktober 2017 | Publikation

Dr. Anja Feierabend, Dr. Jamie Gloor und zwei Forscherinnen aus Singapur publizieren im Journal of Vocational Behavior den Artikel „An inconvenient truth? Interpersonal and career consequences of “maybe baby” expectations“. Der Artikel wurde kürzlich an der 2017 Academy of Management Conference in Atlanta (USA) mit dem „Best Paper Proceeding Award“ und dem „Emerald Best Paper Based on a Dissertation Award“ honoriert.

Abstract: We examine a counterintuitive effect of motherhood and parental leave policies: supervisors and coworkers may view early career women who have yet to have children (i.e., childless women) with greater uncertainty and inconvenience than their counterparts (i.e., childless men), especially in organizations offering more maternal than paternal leave. We propose that these “maybe baby” expectations manifest as workplace incivility, which predicts later career withdrawal. In a time-lagged survey study, we examined 474 early career employees‘ experiences of workplace incivility and career withdrawal cognitions one year later; we also collected objective data on organizations‘ maternal and paternal leave policies. As expected, childless women experienced more incivility than their counterparts, a difference that was greater in organizations with larger differences between maternal leave and paternal leave policies and positively associated with subsequent career withdrawal. Discussion focuses on the importance of examining individual- and organizational-level work-family antecedents for understanding modern workplace mistreatment and its career effects in context, as well as the effective design and implementation of work-family policies.

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